BLOG
HOME ABOUT US PRODUCTS SERVICES EXPERTISE BLOG CONTACT US

ATMOS360 is a Cincinnati, Ohio based Engineering, Design, and Manufacturing organization founded in May, 1989. We specialize in Industrial Air Filter Systems and Equipment that provides improved air quality for employees and reduced levels of dust/aerosols on consumer products. Under new leadership and a Family Owned Business vision, We are poised for business growth, job creation and more community involvement due to the depth and breadth of technical skills, capabilities, and capacity.


ATMOS360, Inc.


64 Circle Freeway Drive

Cincinnati, OH 45246

513.330.5442


info@atmos360.com




    Privacy   |    Terms of Service


Copyright ©2017 ATMOS360, Inc.

All Rights Reserved.


HOME ABOUT US PRODUCTS SERVICES EXPERTISE BLOG CONTACT US
BLOG

Written by: Bob Mayne

ATMOS360 is a Cincinnati, Ohio based Engineering, Design, and Manufacturing organization founded in May, 1989. We specialize in Industrial Air Filter Systems and Equipment that provides improved air quality for employees and reduced levels of dust/aerosols on consumer products.


HOME

Why you don't need explosion protection on drum filters

Published on February 16, 2015 by Larry Wiseman in Solutions




We at ATMOS360 are in the business of engineering and manufacturing dust collection systems and equipment. As we develop the scope for new systems, as well as upgrades to existing systems, we must evaluate the options for the use of a baghouse filter versus a drum filter.


The Need for Explosion Protection

One important factor is the need for explosion protection. The cost of an explosion protection system can add as much as $100,000 to the cost of filtration equipment. The need to provide explosion protection on a baghouse filter is typically straight forward and, in most cases, is needed. Drum filters, however, are a different animal and for some installations, explosion protection is not required. Typically drum filters have rounded floors and inlet ductwork designed to provide a low sweeping inlet. This keeps the floor clean and minimizes the amount of material within the dirty air plenum.


Based on a review of NFPA 654 and discussion with NFPA resources, below is our understanding of the reasoning for why and when to provide explosion protection for drum filters.



Establishing the Dust Concentration

The key to the above is establishing sufficient quantity. MEC (minimum exposable concentration) is determined based on testing of the specific dust being handled. Some companies handling combustible dust take the position that if the quantity of dust is below 25% of MEC explosion protection is not required (NFPA 69 – 8.3.1). For most companies however a recommended safe level is not documented. For these situations the process safety engineer along with all parties evaluating risk must determine the allowable operating level below MEC.


Estimating Suspended Material

Once the MEC is determined the next step is to determine / estimate the amount of material suspended in the dirty air plenum at any given time. For existing systems this can be done by shutting down the systems and collecting and weighing the material within the enclosure. Determining dust quantity for new systems however is a challenge. Engineering must gather inlet dust loading information, filtration efficiencies and estimate dead space accumulations to determine the amount of material that will be in the DAP during operation. In most cases this is a very rough estimate.


Worst Case Scenario

Another consideration is evaluating worst case scenario. During upset conditions (blinded filter media / low inlet velocities) the amount of dust in suspension within an enclosure can significantly increase. Again I refer to the risk evaluation in 7.1.3. The process safety engineer doing the risk analysis must determine the level of risk and decide if explosion protection is required. The risk evaluation would amount to reviewing the likely hood and frequency of the upset conditions occurring.


The Challenge

The challenge is that during the early phases of a project when decisions are made regarding filtration equipment (baghouse vs. drum filter) it is very hard to determine the amount of dust/material that will be suspended in the dirty air plenum of a drum filter. If there is any chance that the amount of dust would be above MEC than explosion protection should be part of option analysis for the filtration equipment. Keep in mind that besides the cost of the explosion protection components, there is also the cost associated with stiffening the filter housing to increase pressure rating. Adding explosion protection to an existing drum filter is very difficult. Unless you are close to an exterior wall you are forced to use explosion suppression. Adding stiffeners to increase MAP can also be costly. The risk of fire and explosion must be worked as part of welding on an enclosure after it is installed.


Conclusion

It is vital that the process safety community get involved in the early phases of a project and is part of decisions regarding explosion protection for all filtration equipment. Remember, each case is different and a hazard evaluation should be part of the process when selecting filtration equipment.


If you have any questions on this blog topic, please feel free to contact me at lwiseman@atmos360.com for further discussion. Please reference that this is response to this blog.


Written by Larry Wiseman, Senior Engineer at ATMOS360


When considering a drum filter or a baghouse, one should consider the following elements to determine what type of system is best for the plant.


Application

In manufacturing there are countless applications. When looking at the application of baghouses verses drum filters one of primary element to consider is the dust being processed.  Drum filters were initially developed for the textiles industry, which produces long fiber dust.  Therefore, if your process generates dust with long fibers then a drum filter may be what you’re looking for.  However, if your process generates small spherical dust then a baghouse may better suit the application.  


Air to Cloth Ratio & Static Pressure Drop

A typical drum filter operates at 100:1 air to cloth ratio verses a baghouse containing 6 filters with a 10:1 air to cloth ratio.  Air to cloth ratio is the volume of air allowed per square foot of media surface. For example, a process requiring 30,000 CFM, therefore:



From a static pressure perspective, typical design pressure drop for a drum filter media is 3” w.g. verses 8” w.g. for a baghouse having equivalent volume.  Design pressure drop is considered to be the pressure drop point where the media should be changed.


Media Efficiency

 As seen above, a typical drum filter operates at 100:1 air to cloth ratio verses a baghouse at 6 to 10:1. With this in mind, media for a drum filter is not as efficient as a baghouse. As an example, a typical drum filter operating a synthetic yellow flat media has a nominal efficiency of 40% on 3 microns and greater.  However, a baghouse operating a 16 ounce polyester needled felt will have a nominal efficiency of 99.8% on 3 microns and greater.


Therefore, in today’s environment where most air is re-circulated back to manufacturing using a drum filter requires backing up the primary drum filter with secondary passive filters.


Capital Cost

Our experience shows that capital cost for a baghouse is greater than a drum filter in most cases.  This is primarily due to two (2) factors:



Operating Cost

Our experience indicates that the ongoing maintenance cost is higher for a typical drum filter system due to the frequent changes to primary and secondary filters required (6 months for drum filter vs. 3 plus years for equivalent baghouse used in paper applications).



If you have any questions on this blog topic, please feel free to contact me at bmayne@atmos360.com for further discussion. Please reference that this is response to this blog.


Drum Filter vs Baghouse: 5 elements to consider when determining the best system for your plant

Published on February 24, 2015 by Bob Mayne in Solutions



HOME Return to Home Page

Estimating Electric Motor Operating Cost Per Year

Published on February 09, 2015 by Bob Mayne in Solutions




When determining the operating cost of a project, it is important to remember motor operating costs.

To determine these costs by using the following formula:

EMOC/YR = (HP) (%FL) (0.746 HP KW) ($/KWH) (HRS/YR)/MOTOR EFFICIENCY

Where


Example

For an example use the following variables to determine an estimated motor annual operating cost:


Therefore

EMOC/YR = (200 HP) (0.85 FL) (0.746 HP KW) ($0.07/KWH) (8,232 HRS/YR) / 0.962

EMOC/YR = $75,965/YR, say $76,000/YR FOR A 200 HP MOTOR

As reference, for efficiency ratings you can use the following table for NEMA 3-Phase premium TEFC motors operating at 1800 RPM:

HP

Motor Efficiency


HP

Motor Efficiency

1

88.5


60

95

1.5

86.5


75

95.4

2

86.5


100

95.4

3

89.5


125

95.4

5

89.5


150

95.8

7.5

91.7


200

96.2

10

91.7


250

96.2

15

92.4


300

96.2

20

93


350

96.2

25

93.6


400

96.2

30

93.6


450

96.2

40

94.1


500

96.2

50

94.5




If you have any questions on this blog topic, please feel free to contact me at bmayne@atmos360.com for further discussion. Please reference that this is response to this blog.

Written by: Bob Mayne

ATMOS360 is a Cincinnati, Ohio based Engineering, Design, and Manufacturing organization founded in May, 1989. We specialize in Industrial Air Filter Systems and Equipment that provides improved air quality for employees and reduced levels of dust/aerosols on consumer products.


Return to Home Page

Troubleshooting Fan Speeds

Published on February 02, 2015 by Bob Mayne in Solutions




Let’s say you are out in the field doing some troubleshooting on an air system fan, or any other type of motor driven sheave (pulley) system, and you need to determine fan revolutions per minute or RPM’s.  The easiest way is to measure the RPM with your tachometer.  You reach into your tool bag only to remember that you let a team member borrow it and they have not yet returned it.  Not to worry because you always have a backup-plan – math!

You can use the following formula to determine the fan RPM:




Find These Variables











Example Problem

Motor RPM from the motor tag - 1750 RPM

Motor (driver) sheave diameter – 10.0” Pitch Diameter (P.D.)

Fan (driven) sheave diameter – 14.0” P.D









Remember, if you know any three variables you can solve the problem. The variable you are trying to find does not have to be the fan RPM.

Note – If you need to take off the drive guard remember ALWAYS lockout/tag out.  However if the fan cannot be shut down during trouble shooting activities, then do the best you can to measure through the guard. In most cases this will be sufficient for understanding the fan speed for troubleshooting purposes.

If you have any questions on this blog topic, please feel free to contact me at bmayne@atmos360.com for further discussion. Please reference that this is in response to this blog.

Written by: Bob Mayne

ATMOS360 is a Cincinnati, Ohio based Engineering, Design, and Manufacturing organization founded in May, 1989. We specialize in Industrial Air Filter Systems and Equipment that provides improved air quality for employees and reduced levels of dust/aerosols on consumer products.


Return to Home Page

5 Reasons Why You Need a Dust Control System

Published on January 26, 2015 by Bob Mayne in Solutions




Within manufacturing processes there are times when production equipment generates dust that can prove difficult to eliminate. Because of this, the manufacturing industry must apply dust control methods to these dust generating processes.

 

The top five reasons for implementing dust control methods into your processes


1. Improve quality of product


2. Reduce employee exposure


3. Reduce equipment process safety risks


4. General housekeeping


5. Increase the bottom line


So now you are considering the installation of a dust control system at your facility and are thinking how to justify it. Consider the following scenario:

These are example given variables of a typical manufacturing process and its dust control needs:


A summary calculation for the cost of production loss for a process without a dust control system over one year’s time:

Production Loss without a Dust Control System (1 year)

$1,715,000 - Cost of Production Loss

$51,400 - Labor Cost to Clean the Line

$1,766,400/yr


Then you can quickly calculate the outlay of investment and operating costs as well as the potential production loss of running a process with a dust control system over one year’s time:

Investment & Operating Cost (1 year)

$900,000 - Capital Investment

$49,000/yr - Motor Electrical Operating Cost

$12,000/yr - Maintenance Cost

$961,000/yr


Production Loss with a Dust Control System (1 year)

$857,500 - Cost of Production Loss

$25,700 – Labor Cost to Clean the Line

$833,200/yr


Therefore, just looking at the simple pay back and not the net present value of the system, one can see- in this scenario a dust control system justifies further investigation.


If you have any questions on why or how to justify a dust control system, please feel free to contact me for further discussion, or comment below.


Reference- for this example the following calculations and assumptions were used:


Estimated Production Loss / Year

EPLPY = (1 hr/day clean-up) (343 days/yr) ($5,000/hr) = $1,715,000/year loss production

EPLPY1 = (0.5 hr/day clean-up) (343 days/yr)($5,000/hr) = $857,500/year loss production (year 1)


Estimate Cleaning Labor / Year

ECLPY = (3 people) (1 hour/day) (343 days/yr) ($50/hr) = $51,450

ECLPY = (3 people) (0.5 hour/day) (343 days/yr) ($50/hr) = $25,700


Estimated Motor Operating Cost / Year

EMOC/YR = (125 HP) (0.85 FL)(0.746) ($0.07/KWH) (8,200 HRS/YR) / 0.954 = $47,690 Main DC Fan

EMOC/YR = (3 HP) (0.85 FL) (0.746) ($0.07/KWH) (8,200 HRS/YR) / 0.895 = $1,220 Fines Handling RAL

Therefore, electrical motor operating cost is estimated to be $49,000/year.


Dust Control System Maintenance Cost

4 quarters x $3,000/quarter = $12,000/year.

Written by: Bob Mayne

ATMOS360 is a Cincinnati, Ohio based Engineering, Design, and Manufacturing organization founded in May, 1989. We specialize in Industrial Air Filter Systems and Equipment that provides improved air quality for employees and reduced levels of dust/aerosols on consumer products.


Return to Home Page

Three Benefits of an Air Filtration System

Published on October 10, 2016 by ATMOS360 Air System Solutions



We wouldn’t be in business if we didn’t fill a need, and for ATMOS360, that need is the need for cleaner air, safer air and healthier air.  Haven’t you heard?  It is the ultimate commodity in 2016.


Dust doesn’t sit too pretty on the lungs, and in some cases, can, over time, lead to any number of dust-related diseases such as asbestosis, silicosis, and farmer’s lung, to name a few.


So what we do serves a purpose, and aligns well with our mission to provide leading-edge, timely and cost-effective air systems solutions to our clients.


In reducing dust, our air filtration systems make for a more health-friendly workplace.  Here are three ways that an air filtration system can benefit your facility.  Air filtration systems can:


1. Improve air quality If you’ve ever been covered in hives just minutes after starting your work day, then you understand how even something as minute as an allergy to dust can really lead to a very bad day from an allergic reaction.  ATMOS360 air filtration systems work to get rid of dust, odor, and other particulates circulating in the air that your employees might be allergic to.  And more so, dust and other particulates can, over time, lead to a deterioration in one’s respiratory health.


2. Keep production floors clean  It might seem inconsequential, but everyone notices when a floor, control panel, production equipment, or quality station doesn’t look its best because it is covered with a layer of dust.  It’s generally not a big deal, but something that employees and potential clients will notice as they’re either working or meeting with you.  It is a small detail that could speak volumes about your company, without you actually saying a word yourself.  So consider investing in an air filtration system for its added benefits, such as keeping dust to a minimum in the air and off production floor and equipment.


3. Maintain work productivity  According to this article in the journal Indoor Air, indoor air quality that is poor can reduce worker productivity from 6 to 9%.  It might not sound like much, but consider what this dollar amount looks like.  Even if you are a one-person operation, the amount could very well be significant.  An air filtration system will help to get rid of dust and keep fresh air circulating, and employee morale will stay level, rather than drop.


An air filtration system is a great way to take preventive measures that can not only keep your facility healthfully solvent, but also clean.  We now invite you to take a look at some of our products to see how they can help your employees to put their best feet forward.  


If you have any questions on this blog topic, please feel free to contact me at cwilliams@atmos360.com for further discussion. Please reference that this is response to this blog.


Return to Home Page